FW eposta alýntýsýdýr:

Sumerian classroom from c. 2,000 BCE.

Cross Cultural and Historical Perspectives on theDevelopmental Consequences of Education by Michael Cole in "Human Development" 2005

 

“This fifteenth century classroom is believed to be the one to which the young William Shakepeare crept 'like a snail unwillingly to school'. Only recently has a more flexibly organised room begun to emerge”. K-6 Best Years of Their Lives?, Primary English Teaching Association (of NSW), 1979.

 

“I've had a look through our collection and there seems to be a distinct lack of any internal photos of the classrooms. ... I've attached a copy of the only classroom shot we have and sadly this is from a very poor photographic copy of the original. Chances are it's from the time of J.T. Bell a headmaster (1918 - 1924) with an interest in this new technology and taken by the local photographer 'Goodman'.
“Let me know if it's of any interest. It's taken in the 'Big Room' which is still standing and strangely not too different from the version in the photo.

“Regards Lindsay Clapperton, Principal
Porepunkah Primary School, Porepunkah, Australia, 3740.”

 

“A typical classroom of the 1930s, with its screwed down desks and bare walls. Teaching and learning have certainly changed! The picture dramatises the need for continuing professional development and inservicing of teachers. [Photo courtesy of NSW Governmment Printing Office]” — Making Good Schools Better, Melbourne 1988.

Note that the sexes are strictly segregated. In my own school, segregation was much more marked even in the 1950s, with boys on one side, girls on the other side of the room. Friends were usually allowed to sit together, but "trouble-makers" were often sat in the front. Some teachers used test-results to determine seating position.

 

“School's in at Ascot, and little pupils, all left arms 'covering' their work, all pencils pointed over the right shoulder and heads bent studiously, set about making neat rows of pot-hooks” (1940s) — Official History of Ascot School, Queensland.
This photograph of about 1950 (Springwood Public School) shows not an extreme but rather a typical 'yesterday' classroom. The desks are arranged to centre attention on the teacher; they probably stayed in this position all the year; there is little scope for any activity other than sitting; and no use is made of the walls. It can be compared with photos of the 1970s classrooms on other pages” — K-6 Best Years of Their Lives?, Primary English Teaching Association (of NSW), 1979.

Note that the principle of sitting boys with boys and girls with girls has started to be eroded in this school. Quite unusual for the 1950s. But the 'tablecloths' on each desk betray that this is a relatively well-off school.

“'First-hand observation, manipulation and investigation provide opportunities for inquiry, discovery and use of initiative. - Aims of Primary Education” K-6 Best Years of Their Lives?, Primary English Teaching Association (of NSW), 1979.

“This teacher has arranged his classroom so that he can work with a small group while the rest of the class, in other groups, go about a variety of projects. — K-6 Best Years of Their Lives?, Primary English Teaching Association (of NSW), 1979.

“The modern 'open space' classroom represents a huge change of environment after centuries of 'screwed down desks in serried rows'.” — k-6 etc., 1979